Lab Capabilties

Scanning Electron Microscopy


BRC's Jeol 6100 Scanning Electron Microscope

BRC's scanning electron microscopes, a conventional tungsten-gun Jeol 6100 and a field-emission Jeol 840F, offer higher resolution than optical microscopes, and have EDS atomic analysis capability. The 840F operates at high resolution even at very low accelerating potential, allowing observation of nonconductive specimens, such as fractured plastics, without the need for coating.



Scanning Electron Microscopy
Ant eye viewed with the Jeol 840F field emission scanning electron microscope.
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Plastic fracture viewed with the Jeol 840F field emission scanning electron microscope.
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy

Click on thumbnails for enlarged views up to the maximum of your display.



Metallography


Metallography
One of BRC's Stereo Microscopes set up for Metallography.

 

Materialography, including metallography, at BRC is performed with an upright compound microscope, the fabled Olympus AX70. This allows unencumbered observation of the entire specimen, a luxury not afforded by conventional inverted metallographs. The AX70 is fully equipped for BF, DF, DIC, polarized, and cross-polarized observation techniques. In addition, a second objective turret has a full range of apochromatic objectives, with 20x and higher oil immersion for maximum numerical aperture, and concomitant highest possible resolution. Image capture, as shown below, utilizes a custom SLR adapter and a full-frame Canon SLR, typically an EOS-1Ds Mark II.


Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography
Metallography

Click on thumbnails for enlarged views up to the maximum of your display.



Stereo Microscopy


Stereo Microscopy

 

The stereo microscope is the most universal tool in forensic science. The one shown above, an Olympus SZH10, is BRC's production stereo microscope, mounted on a stout, motor-driven elevator that offers unparalleled speed and convenience. This microscope is also equipped with a unique objective turret manufactured here at BRC. In addition to the conventional Olympus DF mount, it also accommodates Zeiss objectives, including the magnificent 1.6x Plan-Apochromat S. Image capture, as with the compound microscope, uses a custom camera adapter and Phase One software.

 

BRC's Stereo Microscopy Department
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy on a large specimen
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy
Stereo Microscopy

Click on thumbnails for enlarged views up to the maximum of your display.



Wood Science


Microtome
BRC's Microtome

 

Above is a Heidelberg microtome, used for fine sectioning of a range of polymer and life-science specimens for transmissive microscopic observation. Below are microtomed wood specimens prepared by the noted slide preparator, Ernie Ives of England.

 

Microtome
Microtomed Sample
Microtome
Microtomed Sample
Microtome
Microtomed Sample
Microtome
Microtomed Sample
Microtome
Microtomed Sample

Click on thumbnails for enlarged views up to the maximum of your display.



Rollout Photography


Rollout Photography

Rollout Photography

 

Rollout photos show the round surface of cylinders as if they were "rolled out" flat. This is useful in several applications, including showing heat patterns on cylindrical surfaces such as water heaters. Our system uses a Sinar P2 studio camera with micrometer-controlled swings and shifts, a Betterlight scanning back, and a Linhoff Gigant studio stand (soon to be retrofitted with a servo elevator).

 

Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography
Rollout Photography

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High Speed Photography


These balloon popping photos are triggered with a microphone and captured with a Redlake ES11000 whose interline-transfer CCD boasts an 8 microsecond shutter lag. Illumination is provided by Palflash or Microflash open-spark, capacitive-discharge units of the type made famous by the original high-speed photographer, the late Prof. Harold Edgerton. The shutter lag is negligible compared to the time it takes for the sound from the bursting balloon to reach the microphone, only a few centimeters away. Interline imagers eliminate the oppressive requirement to operate the experiment in total darkness The multi-ligament pops occur when the balloon is filled to it burst pressure. This same system is immediately suitable to high-resolution imaging of bullets in flight.

 

Click on thumbnails for enlarged views up to the maximum of your display.

High Speed Photography
High Speed Photography
High Speed Photography
High Speed Photography
High Speed Photography
High Speed Photography
High Speed Photography
High Speed Photography